RSS Marijuana Investing News
  • Marijuana News Is Moving December 19, 2018
    News content on Marijuana.com is being reborn as Weedmaps News at news.weedmaps.com. While our URL has changed, you can still find breaking news, political coverage, science explainers, and deep dives into the culture of cannabis. The Marijuana.com archives remain available, with the exception of recent selections that have transferred to Weedmaps News. While Marijuana.com won’t […]
    Nicolas Juarez
  • Rights Groups, Unions Call for Ending Marijuana Prohibition December 14, 2018
    A coalition of major civil rights organizations, labor unions and other groups is calling on Congress to completely remove marijuana from the Controlled Substances Act and divert revenue to communities that have been harmed by the enforcement of cannabis prohibition.   “Pass legislation de-scheduling marijuana with racial equity and justice reform components,” reads one recommendation […]
    Marijuana Moment
  • How Trump Government Shutdown Threat Could Affect Marijuana December 13, 2018
    President Donald Trump is threatening to shut down the government if Democrats refuse billions of dollars in funding for a border wall — but the consequences of that action would extend far beyond border security. WASHINGTON (AP) — Trump threatens gov't shutdown in heated meeting with Dem leaders over border wall, squabbling over election results. […]
    Marijuana Moment
  • Elon Musk Confesses: ‘I Have No Idea How To Smoke Pot’ December 12, 2018
    Elon Musk got himself into a bit of trouble after smoking marijuana during an appearance on Joe Rogan’s podcast in September 2018. The move reportedly led to NASA launching an investigation into his company SpaceX’s “workplace safety” and “adherence to a drug-free environment.” But now, in a new interview 60 Minutes, the Tesla founder indicated […]
    Marijuana Moment
  • Cannabis May Qualify for Study Grants as ‘Natural Product’ December 11, 2018
    Federally funded research into marijuana seems to be escalating, with one government agency recently posting a roundup of current “cannabinoid-related funding opportunities” for studies investigating the plant’s therapeutic potential. The National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health (NCCIH) on Dec. 8, 2018, shared a list of four research grant opportunities for studies on “natural products” […]
    Marijuana Moment
  • Surgeon General: Schedule I Hinders Researching Marijuana December 7, 2018
    U.S. Surgeon General Jerome Adams said the federal government should rethink how it classifies drugs like marijuana Dec. 6, 2018, voicing concern that the plant’s current status as a strictly controlled Schedule I substance inhibits research. Adams, who’s previously expressed interest in expanding research into the use of cannabinoids for therapeutic purposes, made the comment […]
    Marijuana Moment
  • Colorado County Considers Canceling Cannabis Convictions December 6, 2018
    BOULDER, Colo. (AP) — Prosecutors in a Colorado county are preparing to dismiss and seal thousands of marijuana possession convictions after state voters legalized the use and sale of cannabis in 2012. The Boulder Daily Camera reported that the Boulder County District Attorney’s Office as part of a “Moving on from Marijuana” program has identified […]
    Associated Press
  • GOP House Leader Calling for Legal Marijuana in Rhode Island December 5, 2018
    The Republican leader in Rhode Island’s House of Representatives thinks the state should fully legalize marijuana. But while that news would typically bode well for reform efforts in state legislatures, the problem is that the Democratic speaker isn’t quite on board — and the House is dominantly controlled by Democrats. In an interview with Rhode […]
    Marijuana Moment
  • ‘Compromise’ Medical Marijuana Bill is Made Into Law in Utah December 4, 2018
    Utah lawmakers approved a controversial medical marijuana bill in a special session Dec. 3, 2018. There’s your final vote on the medical marijuana “compromise.” #utpol pic.twitter.com/w9Ip3KQE8E — Robert Gehrke (@RobertGehrke) December 3, 2018 During the Nov. 6, 2018, election, Utah voters passed a separate medical cannabis initiative, Proposition 2, that would allow patients with certain […]
    Marijuana Moment
  • Study: Vaporizing Flower Produces A More Intense High Than Traditional Smoking Methods December 4, 2018
    Vaping marijuana flower gets you higher than smoking it, according to a new study published in an American Medical Association journal. To test the difference, researchers started by recruiting 17 people who’d consumed cannabis in the past year but had abstained for at least one month. Each individual participated in six sessions that lasted 8 1/2 […]
    Marijuana Moment
mentor36 May 2, 2019

In today’s innovation marketplace, everybody wants to be the first. Tech and non-tech companies alike are racing to raise capital for crypto, blockchain and AI, yet these sectors and technologies are still not even close to mass adoption.

Today’s entrepreneurs are obsessed with disruption. While this is obvious in the world of tech, it may soon be overshadowed by the nascent cannabis industry in the United States. Every time a new state opens an application submission period for a new cannabis dispensary, hundreds of companies apply. Each new market and state have pre-existing demand. Until recently, obtaining cannabis was difficult for many and illegal.

Often, the latecomers who learn from pioneers’ mistakes are the ones who earn the greatest successes.

Most of these companies apply in good faith, only to run into unforeseen problems as the regulatory landscape changes. This is part of the risk inherent to pioneering and disrupting industries. Often, the latecomers who learn from pioneers’ mistakes are the ones who earn the greatest successes.

The Difference Between Pioneering and Innovating

In the world of commerce, paving the way for a new product to hit the market is usually a thankless, time-consuming task. It exposes the weaknesses of the market’s operators and invites newcomers to disrupt the already unstable status quo.

Although household names like Levi’s and Wells Fargo owe their success to the California Gold Rush, historians pay relatively little attention to the hundreds of thousands of casualties the Gold Rush caused. Pioneers paved the way, and innovators – like Levi Strauss – profited from the result.

Similarly, when it comes to cars, Peugeot and Tatra are not household names like Ford and Honda. Henry Ford’s assembly line innovations and Honda’s unbeatable factory flexibility led to those younger companies becoming far more successful than their older counterparts.

Pioneers change the way an industry operates. Airbnb did not succeed because it offered superior service compared to the powerful and deep-pocketed hotel industry. It succeeded because it improved the model that HomeAway and VRBO launched years prior – and did so in a way that undermined the hotel’s typical strengths while capitalizing on their weaknesses.

Pioneering disruption is not equal to innovation, and the cannabis industry will follow the same course.

Although pioneering the creation of new business models is an admirable thing to do, it’s not for everyone. Airbnb has been fighting regulators since the very beginning. The company has been forced to pay fines and taxes that simply didn’t exist until Airbnb’s business model came into being.

Uber’s regulatory troubles regularly make headlines around the world. Although it successfully disrupts every market it enters, established taxi companies and newcomers like Taxify often get the last laugh when they implement Uber-like functionality into existing business models. Uber found it too difficult to compete in China and sold its business to local newcomer Didi Chuxing.

All of these cases demonstrate that being the first or early to introduce a business concept comes with many challenges. Pioneering disruption is not equal to innovation, and the cannabis industry will follow the same course.

Cannabis Industry Pioneers vs. Innovators

In the cannabis industry, being the first often meant living in constant fear of being arrested. During the early years of medical cannabis legislation, it was unclear whether federal authorities would raid and prosecute cannabis cultivators and dispensaries.

Every new cannabis market offers important, expensive lessons to future cannabis entrepreneurs:

  • California changed its cannabis product packaging laws several times before its market went live.
  • Oregon’s lack of state inspectors led to a laboratory testing bottleneck and an upsurge in black market cannabis diversion that the state’s last audit called “currently unstoppable.”
  • The two largest medical marijuana cultivation facilities in Illinois cost about $40 million to build, yet they compete over a market of less than $10 million.
  • Major pioneers like Medmen have paid enormous sums of money to gain entrance into regulatory environments they can’t accurately predict profits from.

Newer cannabis industry entrepreneurs are taking notice of all these obstacles and implementing plans to overcome them. It’s likely that the next generation of medical and recreational dispensaries will have far greater success than today’s biggest names, primarily due to this fact.

Consider the fact that all three of the S&P’s biggest cannabis industry companies have valuations far in excess of their actual sales. It is possible that these large, deep-pocketed organizations will generate enough revenue to justify their valuations, but in the meantime, newer players will enter the picture with greater responsiveness and startup efficiency.

Newcomers to the cannabis industry are setting themselves up for success with highly targeted business objectives, strong executive teams and high-impact advisors. They are navigating the regulatory landscape with more agility than early cannabis pioneers can muster, obtaining lower price-to-sales ratios in the process.

Cannabis entrepreneurs need to be creative in their assessment of the opportunities these new environments create.

This is the hallmark of innovation. While disruptions and inventions typically take the form of new products or services, innovations expand marketplaces and lay the groundwork for new interactions between economic actors in those marketplaces.

What Tomorrow’s Cannabis Innovators Can Do Now

States like Pennsylvania, New York, and New Jersey are currently leaning towards recreational marijuana legislation like those currently in place in Colorado and California. Cannabis entrepreneurs need to be creative in their assessment of the opportunities these new environments create.

Opening a cannabis company is no small task. As regulators gradually come to agree on the requirements each state will ask its business owners to meet, the next generation of pioneering cannabis entrepreneurs will have to adapt. At the same time, a relatively small contingent of innovators – the new generation of Levi Strauss’s – will coincide to provide much-needed products and services to the incoming rush.

These innovators will not be limited to one side of the industry. Innovation thrives on integration, and tomorrow’s cannabis entrepreneurs are going to develop streamlined solutions for tackling today’s inefficiencies in ways that simply are not possible right now. These lean, sophisticated startups will use that path paved by the first generation of cannabis industry incumbents.

Cannabis innovators will need to develop solutions for minimizing the costs and complications of setting up companies in highly regulated environments. This can mean anything from developing superior seed-to-sale tracking POS integrations to building a more efficient supply chain and a path to the consumer.

With luck, the next generation of cannabis entrepreneurs will look to the past when informing their strategic decisions for the future.

© 2018 Highline Media Group